Stop motion workshop for children

Mentor: Daria Kopiec, Polish animator

Date and time: 1-3/12/2016 (Thursday to Friday)

14:00 – 16:00h

Cinematheque of Macedonia

Children – Pierrots (Air of mystery in the paintings of Tadeusz Makowski).

Daria_Workshop_01The art of Polish painter – Tadeusz Makowski will be inspiration in building the story of animated etude produced in plasticine stop motion animation. During three workshop meetings participants will create a short animated film which will be presented at the end of the festival.
First meeting will be devoted to Tadeusz Makowski’s art. Then participants will create a short script inspired by the artist’s paintings. Before starting to make the film, they’ll create a storyboard. After discussing the action in the planned scenes, they’ll start preparing the scenography. During the second meeting participants will continue working on scenography and puppets and start shooting. The third meeting will be wholly devoted to shooting the animated film.
Daria_Workshop_02Paticipants of the workshop will have a Chance to observe the proces of film creation starting from the idea till the film being ready. They will be able to see finished etude at the end of festival.
The workshop is meant for the youth aged 8-17.
The workshop will last 6 hours (3 x 2 hours).

Daria_Workshop_03About Tadeusz Makowski

Tadeusz Makowski – painter, ilustrator, and graphic artist, author of texts on history of art. Born in Oświęcim in 1882, died in Paris in 1932. In 1918 Makowski introduced a motif that would be central to his work thereafter – the figure of a child. The artist used radically simplified shapes – restricting himself to triangles, cylinders, and cones – and made his lines clearer and weightier. He narrowed his range of colors to earth tones, primarily browns tinged with red and grey. created a grotesque vision of human existence, a world dominated by masks and props, a reality that is a masquerade populated with melancholy, such as his Pierrot-children frozen in theatrical poses. These “clowns” are often accompanied by pets and birds and exist in an unspecified, abstract space, in theatrical surroundings, in the interiors of studios, huts, or in courtyards. They are often accompanied by home animals. Carnival scenes are another recurring motif, one that evokes wonder.